Wednesday, April 7, 2021

The #1 Reason All Writers Take Risk. #IWSG #AmWriting #Noir #Blogging #Mystery #Horror #Marriage #Linguistics


 Enter HERE! https://www.insecurewriterssupportgroup.com/p/iwsg-sign-up.html to join Alex J. Cavanaugh's neurotic writing world!


Our Twitter handle is @TheIWSG and hashtag is #IWSG.

Every month we announce a question. The question is optional. Share advice, ask questions and help others seeking answers HERE.

The awesome co-hosts for the April 7 posting of the IWSG are PK Hrezo, Pat Garcia, SE White, Lisa Buie Collard, and Diane Burton!

April 7 question - Are you a risk-taker when writing? Do you try something radically different in style/POV/etc. or add controversial topics to your work?


I believe all creative output involves risk. As an independent content creator and social media specialist I wear many hats. My last writing assignment involving travel sent me to Japan. It seems like a lifetime ago, and it's only been two years. 

Adjusting to different brands for multiple clients requires me to shift voice and perspective. My personal projects, noir mystery novels, horror/sci-fi shorts, auto-bio books and essays, are where I can let my guts show.

I try to make work that is accessible to everyone. To the best of my abilities I write to the smartest person in the room. I challenge my own beliefs, philosophies et cetera. While you don't have to be an intellectual to digest my work I believe my work also appeals to the intellectual. Hope springs eternal.

Lots of subjects gnaw at me, and I compulsively ask questions.

Take the history of our language. Even our modern colloquialisms. When we're married we're off the "meat-market".  Linguistically speaking the terms bride and groom dehumanizes the sanctity of marriage, but does it really? The term bride comes from the bridal-bit used to steer the working beast here and there. The bridal bit insures it obeys. The groomsman/men are the masters who groom and command the animal. 

I've been married before. I didn't feel any of those things. Then again, just because we didn't invent the rules doesn't mean we can't win the game. Am I dressing down marriage as a mere game? No way! A game is fun, and something you can win. According to linguistics marriage is a blood-sport. 

This is why writing is a risk. It allows us to be at odds with ourselves. The longer my friends and family don't know what's going on inside my head the longer they wont feel the need to sleep in shifts.

Creating involves risk.

See? I'm doing it again.

What do you think? Are you a risk taker when writing?
 

19 comments:

  1. "I believe all creative output involves risk." Yes, yes, yes!

    I never actually thought of where "bride" and "groom" came from before. It is a bit cringy, though.

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    1. Right? Food for thought. Writing has always been a way for me to organize the ranting in my head. It takes extra effort to make it digestible for mass consumption for sure. Still getting the hang of it.

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    2. Right? Food for thought. Writing has always been a way for me to organize the ranting in my head. It takes extra effort to make it digestible for mass consumption for sure. Still getting the hang of it.

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  2. Sounds like it takes both the bride and the groom to make anything happen. I've heard that the man is the head and the wife the neck that turns the head.
    I lived in Japan when I was little. I bet it's changed beyond recognition.

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    1. Ha! Nice, Alex. Japan was amazing. Happy IWSG Day, Blog Father. -I saw that on a previous post. ;)

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  3. I love how you slipped a casual family-threat in there, all crafty and subtle. It made me chuckle. I also would rather my family not read any of the dark corners lurking in my mind. They put up with my teen years, that was really enough penance for everyone involved. Happy IWSG day!

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    1. Ha. I'm still making up for my teen years. Happy IWSG Day!

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    1. It's crazy how the history of language can predict the future. I'm fortunate to have many men in my life who use their strength to help others. A few creepers still fly under my radar, but I don't let them ruin my relationships with the good ones. My ex-husband and I are still very good friends.

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  5. I never knew where bride and groom came from but it sounds like we need to change how we talk about them.

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    1. Sometimes the meaning words get lost in time. Every word is a riddle.

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  6. Thank you for stopping by my blog. I agree. Being creative is risky. Being a content creator of any kind puts you at risk to combat yourself and anyone who engages with your creation.

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  7. The historical context of marriage (property assessment, transfer of ownership, marriage contract, purity of "product", etc.) is pretty disgusting. And now, the words bride and groom is added to the list. Definitely need to create new words.

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    1. It begs the question - Can words transcend their origins?

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  8. You are right! Creating and putting ourselves out there is a risk in itself.

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    1. Thank you H.R. Sinclair. My motto is to ignore mean people and support others the way I wish to be supported. Happy IWSG!

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  9. Learned something new today--bride/bridal. Interesting. Never felt that way in the 48 years I've been married. But who knew??? I agree that all creativity is risk-taking. That's how we grow as writers, as people.

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    1. Agreed. That and not letting silly rules of logic constrict your creativity. Inventing your own parallel universe gives you free rein.
      It works 70% of the time, 100% of the time.
      See?

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