Wednesday, August 2, 2017

Being Championed by Strunk and White - My Pet Peeves

Let's get insecure together, because it's IWSG first Wednesday! Time for Alex J. Cavanaugh's Insecure Writer's Support Group. This blog hop is a brave space for writers to share what we're insecure about and offer others advice and support. CLICK HERE TO JOIN!

This post may come off as high-handed, so let me preface my point by saying I cringe daily reading old work of mine that has lots of problems with bad editing and obnoxious sentimentalities. 

Living in San Francisco, I currently work as an editor-in-chief for Vinformant.com, senior copy writer at Eratosenterprises.net, and a writer for https://www.bayarea.com/author/15510/. I'm considering tacking on advice columnist to the list, because I want to be Cheryl Strayed, E. Jean, and Jenny Lawson. 

My biggest pet peeve when it comes to reading, writing, editing is when readers/writers point out inconsistent grammar and editing flaws, inconsistently. This. Happens. I have one image to give them. 


 If Strunk and White said to keep the Oxford Comma, then I'm gonna use the Oxford Comma. Can't settle an argument on grammar and the Google Oracle is only creating more confusion? Look above for divine intervention.

Thoughts? Feelings? Am I being too prickly?

14 comments:

  1. No, I don't think you are being too picky, Adrienne! But then I love my Strunk and White too! Happy writing this month!

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    1. Thanks, Fundy Blue! Happy writing. Utilize that Oxford Comma. ha

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  2. I've never heard of Strunk & White. Is this bad?

    I think the Internet is destroying grammar. The bar has been lowered so much that horrible mistakes are tolerated for the sake of speed.

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    1. It's a famous opinionated style guide where Strunk himself questions his own work in the introduction. Because it's so famous, it has received some scathing reviews. It was later co-authored by famous American writer, E.B. White. While it's mostly a suggestion on style, it's widely known and easy to reference. Kalman created a fantastic illustrated version.

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  3. You know I'm with you on this. And I love Jenny Lawson's memoirs.

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    1. Ha! Thanks Yvonne. Lawson is hilarious.

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  4. You do so much. I certainly can see you having a column. That would be neat.

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    1. Thanks, Chrys. That means a lot coming from you!

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  5. Ah, Strunk and White. I haven't thought about that in years. But given all of the grammatical mistakes I make, I should probably get myself a copy. Love Jenny Lawson. An advice columnist along her lines would be awesome.

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    1. Truth! It would be like an anti-advice column. I love it.

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  6. English is an aberrant language cobbled together like Frankenstein's monster. It's bloated and convoluted and contrarian and only getting worse with time.

    Why the hell does "to dust" mean BOTH to ADD dust as well as to take dust AWAY?

    At the same time, it's open to a wide interpretation of art and poetry, so take that for what it's worth.

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    1. Agreed. Struggling with it I feel dark and complex, and sometimes nuts. Semantics.

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  7. Yeah. When I started freelancing, I've decided to copy edit and proofread according to CMOS and Oxford, depending on the English I'm using.

    I just finding it way too easy to be confused with grammar "rules" because I'm increasingly discovered that those "rules" are determined by style.

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    1. Yup. Totally! I'm picking up what you're laying down, Misha. Consistency is key. Pick a style and stick with it. My first novel was published without Oxford commas. I can't even look at it.

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