Tuesday, September 1, 2015

Beethoven went through hella notebooks.

“Don’t only practice your art, but force your way into its secrets, 
for it and knowledge can raise men to the divine.”
Ludwig van Beethoven 


This is my stack. The red moleskin with my, Clockwork Orange sticker, "I'm completely reformed." is my favorite idea starter.









Did I keep notebooks because I needed to write? Or did I need to write because I kept notebooks?

I was always given notebooks as presents when I was a kid. Probably because blank paper is cheap and it got me to sit down and shut up.

The first piece I remember feeling proud of was a play I wrote when I was seven. I performed it with my cousin for my family on Easter Sunday. The script didn't have many words, but consisted of blocked out story boards on construction paper. 

The plot was simple.

Two girls find a baby on the beach. They look for the baby's family. After some research they realize the baby is dead. The end. 

According to Christopher Booker's seven plots of literature, this plot falls under quest and tragedy. It should have sunk under rebirth. I got the whole resurrection thing backwards, or maybe I'm  a visionary.

So when Sri Lankan poet, and my professor, Pireeni Sundaralingham insisted everyone juggle notebooks, I let go of all my notebook hoarding shame.

I know many of you keep multiple journals. My main stays include my idea starter, my notes and outlines for each project (which right now equates to three notebooks), a personal development notebook, and my planner/diary/dream journal. 

How many notebooks do you keep on rotation?


2 comments:

  1. I'm about to start again. I think that's something I'm missing as a person with a computer now. I used to always have a notebook or Trapper-Keeper-esque binder with me, and I would just write. I've lost that over technology.

    I like that at 7 you were writing the tough things. My first short story was about a girl who comes home to find her family killed, and she sets out to avenge them. I was 9. :)

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    Replies
    1. Ha! We were scary little girls. Writing in a notebook gives me a sense of freedom that my computer doesn't. I believe we should all keep doing it.

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